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On June 12, Russia celebrates its national holiday, which in various years was called differently, but for a long time it has been called simply “The Day of Russia” 🇷🇺

In the now distant 1990, on that very day, the “Declaration of State Sovereignty of the RSFSR” was adopted. In those troubled times preceding the final disintegration of the Soviet Union, with a long history and at the same time, a completely young state, the government began its new path.

On this day throughout the country, there are many celebrations and festivals taken place, which are attended by residents of the country of all ages. In the Kremlin, the State Prizes of the Russian Federation are presented, and the main celebrations, of course, take place in Moscow on Red Square and end with a grand firework show in honor of the historic day.
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This is the last post in our Museums of Eastern Europe series! Our final destination is Prague, Czech Republic.

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The Museum of Communism in Prague shows the life behind the Iron Curtain during the totalitarian era in Czechoslovakia from 1948 until 1989. This museum is a must-go for everyone who is interested in the history of the 20th century. It offers its visitors an immersive look on every aspect of life under the communist regime, from sports and arts (specifically Socialist Realism) to censorship and propaganda in the media. The museum itself is very interactive and visualized so every visitor can get a little more understanding of what it is like to live in a communist country.

#visitamuseum
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Enjoy everything the Museums of the Eastern Europe series has to offer! Today's trip will get us to the Latvian Ethnographic Open-Air Museum (Riga, Latvia)
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One of the oldest and largest open-air museums in Europe is located in a majestic pine forest on the banks of Lake Jugla, just a 30-minute drive from downtown Riga. This museum is unique when compared to similar museums around the world with the fact that it began to collect its exhibitions before the war, and thus many of its exhibition objects are in very good condition. 118 historical buildings from all four of Latvia’s provinces – Kurzeme, Vidzeme, Zemgale and Latgale, have been put on display at the museum. The buildings range in age, and most of them were originally constructed between the 17th century up all the way up until the 1930s.
The only place in Latvia where it is possible to view the similarities and differences of how people used to live in the various historical regions of Latvia. View the work of traditional craftsmen and try-out first-hand moulding pottery, weaving baskets, making honey or forging coins, or participate in traditional games the Latvians of old used to play. The perfect place for a leisurely stroll in the fresh air in summer, while in winter the museum offers people cross-country skiing through the park or take sledge rides down the hills, as well as try-out some ice fishing in the lake.
#visitamuseum
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Hey Alcohol lovers!
Today in our series on the Museums of Eastern Europe we got just the museum for you! The Polish Vodka Museum is the one that every alcohol-enthusiast should visit while in Poland. The museum is not like a random place filled with million bottles of Vodka where everyone goes to drink. On the contrary, the museum is located where the Warsaw Vodka Factory “Koneser” used to operate, a complex building in neo-Gothic style in which the visitors get to see firsthand where vodka used to gain its unique and pure flavor.

Source: muzeumpolskiejwodki.pl/
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This Wednesday we are taking you to experience the best of Varna Archaeological Museum located in Varna, Bulgaria!
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This interesting museum will introduce you to the earliest evidence of the human presence in the Varna region, Northeast Bulgaria. Initiated by the two brothers, Herman and Karel Škorpil, the Varna Archaeological Society was established, leading to the opening of the first exhibition of the Museum on June 11, 1906. Fun fact: the location of the first exhibition was a room of the Girls’ High School. The timeline covered by the museum starts in the Early Palaeolithic Age and ends with the Iron Age. #visitamuseum
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